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Name Jessica Fishlock
Gender Female
Ethnic Welsh
Job Welsh Footballer
  Melbourne City Women captain
Desc Jessica Fishlock is Wales gay icon

Affiliation

Org Wales Women National Team
Club as Player Reign FC
  Melbourne City Women

2017 02 18 Retrieve

[Jessica Fishlock writes about winning consecutive Australian W-League titles with her club] When the final whistle went at the weekend, it made every second of the season worthwhile. The juice was definitely worth the squeeze

2017 04 08 Retrieve

[Jessica Fishlock speaks about Louis van Gaal before making her 100th appearance for Wales and becoming the first player, male or female, to reach the milestone for the country] Louis van Gaal took a couple of our training sessions. He was head coach of the [AZ Alkmaar] men’s team at the time and was very pro the women’s game. Both sessions he put on started with a basic passing routine but they lasted for ages because he was obsessed with them being perfect. He’d shout: ‘Stop, back to the beginning’, if someone did something that was not 100 per cent right. I’ve never seen attention to detail like it. It was awe-inspiring but also a little crazy, which tallies with the stories you hear about how he drilled the players at Manchester United. I spoke to him a few times and he was really nice. His knowledge of football is insanely good

2019 07 04 Retrieve

When you get injured it’s a terrible feeling anyway, but when you get injured and you’ve been playing well it’s a sucker punch. But with regards to my rehab and with regards to coming back, I’m not worried at all. I’ll be back early next year. It’s just my ACL. My other ligaments are fine, the rest of my cartilage is fine, so it’s a really straight forward in and out kind of job. I’ll only be on crutches for two weeks and then I’ll be walking

2020 07 02 Retrieve

[Fishlock was initially invited to view the ‘Game Changer’ cartoon last year and quickly became a vocal advocate for its powerful message of acceptance and respect] I love this film. I remember watching it for the first time and thinking ‘God, I wish I’d seen this in school, I really do’, and that’s when I realised just how strongly I felt about its importance

[She has previously described this time in her life as “hell on earth” and says knowing next to nothing about sexual orientation] I didn’t have a level of understanding really until I was 16 or 17. I’d gone from 12 to that point mostly feeling that there was something wrong with me, and having no one to go and speak to about it. I didn’t see anything regarding LGBTQ apart from suggestions it was wrong or that it needed treatment, or something stupid like that

[Fishlock sought reassurances from her sister - a teacher - about how ‘Game Changer’ was pitched] I said to her, ‘just let me know what you think - is it too strong?’ I really liked the message, but I don’t deal with kids. But my sister came back and said that she felt the language was great, and that it was a strong message but it wasn’t forceful. That was just what I wanted to hear. As soon as I got that from her, I said this is something that I really want to be a part of because it’s important

[Fishlock thinks the question is a no-brainer] Your education should obviously be about English, maths and science, but it should also be about what has shaped the world and humanity. LGBTQ history is that, black lives history is that - they’re prominent right now but we as people should have had the right to learn about them years ago

We’ve never really had anyone be brave enough to have that conversation before, but now we are finding those people. We’ve also found an amazing animated film that gets the message across without forcing it. That’s what’s so beautiful about it

2020 07 04 Retrieve

[Black team-mates’ ‘harrowing’ stories helped me understand struggle] Being here and witnessing it, feeling it first hand, has probably been one of the most incredible times from a social aspect that I have probably [ever] been involved in. We have black players and players of colour in our team, as a group we actually sat down and they have been really open in telling their stories, the experiences of their lives growing up in American and being black. Honestly I cannot even put into words what that did for me as a person. Listening to their stories is quite harrowing really, if you don’t do that you will never know, learn, understand or want to make change. I think one of the more important things you can do is listen, hear them and then actively go and make the change. Being here in American and witnessing this, I’m really proud because of the athletes here do have a very strong voice and they are not afraid to use it, that has been very visible

2020 07 05 Retrieve

[Jess Fishlock says coming from Wales is a blessing as it has made her work harder] I think it’s my desire I guess, and my motivation and my determination. And also I really do have a willingness to be better. Not only be better but to be the best. I want to show that I can play, or have played alongside, and with, and against - and not only competed with but sometimes been better than - the best. And I feel coming from Wales, you have to do an awful lot more to get the recognition other people would get that come from a bigger country. And for my whole career I think that I have really felt that. People might say that it is a hindrance but I think it has [actually] made better

Being injured is not nice but it’s given me a little bit of time to get my body right and my mind right. That has actually refreshed my determination to keep going and keeping at the highest level, but now I am ready to get playing. The hardest thing for me has probably been being away from home throughout this period. What I believe was a big factor (in sustaining the injury) is that I spent eight months in Europe with Lyon and the training was different. How they train in France is very different to how we train here in America. They are on the field a lot more which is great, but they also don’t focus an awful lot on strength maintenance. At the time I didn’t see a problem because I was playing, and felt fit, and felt strong, but when I came back to the US the training changed. We travel a lot more here and we are not on the field as much as we were in France. I think for my body, that adaptation to the training just wasn’t there

Being here and witnessing it, feeling it first hand, has probably been one of the most incredible times from a social aspect that I have probably [ever] been involved in. We have black players and players of colour in our team, as a group we actually sat down and they have been really open in telling their stories, the experiences of their lives growing up in American and being black. Honestly I cannot even put into words what that did for me as a person. Listening to their stories is quite harrowing really, if you don’t do that you will never know, learn, understand or want to make change. I think one of the more important things you can do is listen, hear them and then actively go and make the change. Being here in American and witnessing this, I’m really proud because of the athletes here do have a very strong voice and they are not afraid to use it, that has been very visible.